Tuesday, May 09, 2006

durbanites living in putney

A question for my Saffa London readers:

Why is it that you all live in Southfields, Putney?

Does it remind you of Durban or what?

14 comments:

Dave said...

I have lived in many different locations of London and I can honestly say that Southfields is a council estate sh*thole with terrible transport links, lived there for 2 weeks with firends when I arrived and then moved straight outta that 'hood.

Putney is completely different. Upmarket and far classier than its poor Southfields neighbour, Putney has awesome transport links and in the past year has developed some great party venues.

Putney rocks, keen to move back there!

Wezzo said...

Wow that's just unreal. My story is exactly the same as Dave's yet in future tense. I'm planning on moving to the UK at the end of the year, staying with a few dodgy mates in Southfields for 2 weeks then heading off to hills of Putney. Dave doesn't know it yet but I'll then be shacking at his place - we've never met. Coincidence?

Anonymous said...

This is totally irrelevant to the post, but how come I can't access your archives? The wife and I find your blog brilliant! ChuckBrown

Inyoka said...

London is full of ghettos. Southfield is the Saffa ghetto.

What I cannot understand is why people move 6 thousand miles and then flock together to the same area. Surely the object of moving to another country is to experience something different? Different food, different weather, different points of view, different ways of looking at issues and doing things.

And learning to appreciate real beer. Not lager.

I cannot see the point of gathering together and going down to some South African style pub to drink shitty Castle and talk about the Boks and old times.

Why not stay in Joeys or Cape Town if they want that kind of lifestyle?

Inyoka

Inyoka said...

London is full of ghettos. Southfield is the Saffa ghetto.

What I cannot understand is why people move 6 thousand miles and then flock together to the same area. Surely the object of moving to another country is to experience something different? Different food, different weather, different points of view, different ways of looking at issues and doing things.

And learning to appreciate real beer. Not lager.

I cannot see the point of gathering together and going down to some South African style pub to drink shitty Castle and talk about the Boks and old times.

Why not stay in Joeys or Cape Town if they want that kind of lifestyle?

Inyoka

Inyoka said...

London is full of ghettos. Southfield is the Saffa ghetto.

What I cannot understand is why people move 6 thousand miles and then flock together to the same area. Surely the object of moving to another country is to experience something different? Different food, different weather, different points of view, different ways of looking at issues and doing things.

And learning to appreciate real beer. Not lager.

I cannot see the point of gathering together and going down to some South African style pub to drink shitty Castle and talk about the Boks and old times.

Why not stay in Joeys or Cape Town if they want that kind of lifestyle?

Inyoka

Tammy said...

Congrats on your award!!!

Peas on Toast said...

Dave and Wezzo - good times ahead chaps.

ChuckBrown - My archives have been taken away because the way I see it, everything not displayed on this page is in the past. But thanks for the compliments anyway ;)

Inyoka - I couldn't agree with you more. That's why I'm not living in London, because I fear that I will only end up hanging out with other South Africans. Or worse still, living in a house with 15 other South Africans.

Tammy - Ta. :)

duke said...

i don't live in Southfields. Or even London - Oxford's far more pleasant.
Inyoka and co - some Saffas aren't here for the culture or to experience England - they just want pounds, and the ability to travel. So living in an area with a bunch of other Saffas makes sense - if they could earn the money they do here in Cape town or Jozi, they would, but since they can't they live in the closest thing to South Africa in the UK.

It's not for me, but I understand the reasoning. After 3 years here, I often find myself wishing I was surrounded by Saffas...

Anonymous said...

Inyoka & Co, when you are so far away from home, for whatever reason that might be, it is always nice to take a little something of home with you and if that means living in an area that is seen as the capital of South Africa then so be it. Just cause you're living in an area that is mainly populated by South Africans, doesn't mean that you're not allowing other nationalities into your circle of friends. I live in Earlsfield, again, mainly South Africans living in the area, but yet have some really good British friends, I have friends from all over the world that i spend my time with and who I have taught about Biltong, Boerewors, Fritos, Niknaks, Johnny Clegg and even shitty Castle. I don't want to seem rude, but it's mentality like that, that's made me leave SA and probably what makes you stay. You should be proud that there is a country who has adopted us and trying to make us feel welcome by providing us with things we know. Since I moved to London, and an area filled with South Africans, I have experienced the British, the German, the French, the Spanish, the Welsh, the Irish, the Scottish, The American, The Kiwi, The Aussie and the Turkish culture. How many cultures have you experienced by staying put? I guess what I'm trying to say is that it doesn't matter where you live in London, or even who you live with, if you are here to experience cultures and the world, you will. Just cause you're hanging out with people who understand your situation and know what it is like to miss your mom when you are sick and just know what it's like to be so far away from home, doesn't mean the experience is pointless. I used to live in Southfields and nothing made me prouder to be a South African than seeing a flock of green jerseys on match days! I guess it's something only those who have experienced, can understand.

Peas on Toast said...

Duke - Tis true. Some people want just pounds and an easy travel base. It makes sense. I won't speak for Inyoka, but here's an exmaple from me. I chose to live in Frnca. Where I could earn euros AND learn a new langauge AND explore serious cultural diversity. Sure, the euros aren't as strong,but the food and wine made up for that. :) Either way, I guess one must remember that everyone has different priorities. My time to live in London will come eventually.

Anon - also point taken. But we don't know what else Inyoka has experienced. He might've lived in Japan for 5 years for all we know. Respect if that's the case.
It sounds like you miss home a little, bless. Just remember those taxis, stolen cell phones and our tax bureau. That should make you feel better. :)

Janine said...

Hello Peas - love your blog, think you're a damn fine writer! Just felt a need to write a little something something ... In response to anon: point taken that you're experiencing different cultures while living amongst Saffas in the UK. I'm living in SA, have done Europe but never felt up to the UK thing... My basic point is that, if you want to experience other cultures, and be around Saffas, the perfect place to be is, well, South Africa! I feel that not enough people make the effort to learn about/ experience and then fully appreciate what we have here. I'm originally from CPT, lived and worked in JHB for a while, but am now in KZN - now that's mixing and meeting people from different cultures... I'm learning to speak Setswana/ Sesotho and isiZulu. It's new, different, but truly fucking familiar and damn awesome. Come home, and truly experience a great mix of cultures ... (no, this isn't a cheesy homecoming revolution ad!)

Inyoka said...

Hi Peas, Anonymous and others.

Further to my comments about Southfield being a Saffa ghetto. Good to hear that there are people other than Saffas living there and that you have managed to meet them. Perhaps I was too hasty with my comments.

By the way - I also live in the UK, but far away from other South Africans although I do see them from time to time, mainly in London.

Love it here - and still eat biltong and boerewors. We have a butcher who makes about 30 different kinds of sausage, including boerewors. And very good they are too.

Inyoka

PS - sorry Peas for the multiple posts - please delete the extra 2.

Peas on Toast said...

Janine - thanks babe!

Inyoka - I absolutely agree with you. I'd also try and live in a place where not alot of Saffas reside. But that's just me. I like to make things harder for myself :)